Mind welcomes news NICE guidelines for treating schizophrenia

Filter

Filter by categories

Year
News topics

Posted on 12/02/2014

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has released new guidelines for the management and treatment of schizophrenia and psychosis.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has released new guidelines for the management and treatment of schizophrenia and psychosis.

 

The guidelines have implications not just for those living with schizophrenia, but also make recommendations to healthcare professionals working with people who might be at risk of developing the condition, and those who care for people with schizophrenia.

Naomi Phillips, Head of Policy and Campaigns at Mind, commented:

 

“We welcome these new guidelines, particularly the emphasis on peer support, self-management and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), as well as monitoring physical health, medication and other treatments. Often it is a combination of medication, therapy and other self-management techniques that are most effective in helping people manage a mental health problem, and what works for one person won’t necessarily help another."

 

“We are pleased that NICE has acknowledged CBT can help not just those with a diagnosis, but that it could also play a preventative role and its use should be extended to those who may be prone to developing schizophrenia. We know that talking therapies can be effective and don’t have the unpleasant side effects that many drugs bring. The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) scheme has allowed many more people to be referred for talking therapies, but we know there are still huge variations in waiting times across the country. For early intervention to work, it’s vital people are able to access the services they need within 28 days."

 

“Even though schizophrenia is fairly common, affecting about 1 in 100 people, there is still a huge stigma surrounding it which can prevent people seeking help. That’s why it’s so vital that healthcare professionals monitor individuals and look out for symptoms early, particularly those identified as being more susceptible. With the right support, it is possible to recover.”

Mental Health A-Z

Information and advice on a huge range of mental health topics

> Read our A-Z

Training

Helping you to better understand and support people with mental health problems

> Find out more

Special offers

Check out our promotional offers on print and digital booklets, for a limited time only

> Visit our shop today