Resilience

Working with the capabilities and capacities of African Caribbean people for mental wellness

A masterclass with Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling, Jamaica

Thursday 27 February 2014, 1pm – 3.45pm

 

In collaboration with HS Consultancy, we are holding a seminar for people working with African Caribbean communities on mental wellness. The aim of the seminar is too enable delegates to see how working to build resilience and capitalising upon the capacities and capabilities of African Caribbean people can help to improve outcomes for people stuck in the system and help prevent people at risk from developing problems that lead to mental health service use. The workshop key note speech will be developed by Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling.

 

 

What is resilience and how does it apply to young African Caribbean men (YACM)?

Resilience is the ability of people to cope in the face of adversity, drawing on their internal strengths and those within the social systems in which they live. International studies indicate that social context of many YACM is a critical factor in the higher than average rates of admission to psychiatric hospital. One way to help reduce the number of YACM who break down and end up using psychiatric services is to build resilience in their emotional, psychological, social and economic worlds.

 

Who is the seminar aimed at?

  • People working in YACM programmes
  • NHS leads working with African Caribbean people in mental health services
  • Non statutory sector providers working with African Caribbean people.

 

What will I get out of the seminar?

Delegates will hear concrete examples of how the optimism that the worker has about the potential for the service user to recover influenced expectations that they both had, and the progress made as a result. Delegates will hear how this translates into different forms of relationships when working with African Caribbean people with mental health problems.

 

About Dr Robertson Hickling

Hilary Robertson-Hickling is a Lecturer in Human Resource Management in the Mona School of Business and Management at the University of the West Indies in Mona Jamaica. She teaches Organizational Behaviour, Organizational Development and Team Building and Management, and Pastoral Care and Counselling  She has studied at the  University of the West Indies , Johns Hopkins University USA and University of Birmingham, England and has taken her concerns about migration and mental health into her research at home in the Caribbean  and into the Caribbean Diaspora. Not only has she published articles in scholarly journals and in the popular press but has published a book entitled White Squall on the Land Narratives of Resilient Caribbean People which has been recently published as an ebook by Hope Road Publishers which specialises in the work of Caribbean, African and Asian writers and is based in London.

As a member of a transnational family she has travelled extensively in North America, the UK and Europe as well having the opportunity to visit continental Africa for a variety of reasons. A concern about the social, economic and psychological wellbeing of Africans at home and abroad has led her to collaborate with her husband Frederick Hickling Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at UWI Mona in the planning of interventions and the conduct of research as well as lecture tours locally and internationally. She has worked as a management consultant and a psychologist.

 

Venue

Theobalds Room

Monticello House
45 Russell Square
London
WC1B 4JP

Fee for the event is £20.  Places may be purchased online

If you require an invoice email [email protected]

 

Programme

13:00 – 13:45

Registration and light refreshments

13:45 – 14:00

Welcome and Introduction (Marcel Vige, Head of Equality at Mind)

14:00 – 14:45

Key note presentation from Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling: Resilience: Experiences supporting recovery in Jamaica and the UK

14:45 – 15:30

Q&A and plenary discussion

15:30 – 15:45

Evidence that demands a response (Hári  Sewell, Director, HS Consultancy )

15:45

Close

Working with the capabilities and capacities of African Caribbean people for mental wellness

A masterclass with Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling, Jamaica

(held on Thursday 27 February 2014)

In collaboration with HS Consultancy, Mind’s Equality Improvement Team hold a seminar for people working with African Caribbean communities on mental wellness. The aim of the seminar was too enable delegates to see how working to build resilience and capitalising upon the capacities and capabilities of African Caribbean people can help to improve outcomes for people stuck in the system and help prevent people at risk from developing problems that lead to mental health service use.

The workshop key note speech was delivered by Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling.

Find out what we mean by resilience and more about Dr Hilary

The full recording of her intervention can be downloaded online

The main themes discussed during the seminar were:-

  • Services must work with people’s skills and strengths
  • People have hidden strengths and may not even recognise these themselves.
  • Resilience is a process, not a personality trait
  • No one is so ill that they can’t be resilient and no one is so resilient that they can’t become unwell
  • It is crucial to understand why African and Caribbean people have left their countries and migrated to the UK (first generation, second generation, family reunions, etc.)
  • Part of the resilience building process is genuinely understand one’s own culture, history and narrative, in order to develop a knowledge of self
  • People need to be supported to be able to dream again, to feel they can achieve something in life (e.g. educational achievements, having a mentor – someone who believes in you)
  • This point in life is not the end of the story
  • There is a need to create more “safe-spaces” where people feel welcome, accepted and genuinely supported
  • It is vital to recognise and facilitate the role that families and communities have to play in building resilience
  • Services need to develop cultural appropriateness and take a much more subtle approach
  • It is important to have a team of workers able to contribute different skills, knowing their strengths and limitations.
  • Build individual, team and organisational resilience and strengths for the benefit of service users, by working across boundaries

The underlying resilience model proposed by Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling is the so called “life-cycle” model which is based on the acknowledgment that one needs to understand a the person’s whole life (culture, past, present, expectations, ambitions for the future, etc.) and act on all aspects of the person (physical and mental health, social connections, family, need for achievement, interests, passions…) to build durable resilience.

For this model to be effective the system needs to enable services to respond when people need it, cutting waiting times and promoting integrated support. The system also needs to facilitate and promote the involvement of families and communities.

If you would like to be kept informed about similar seminars or developments email [email protected] or like the ‘HS Consultancy’ and ‘Mind Charity’ pages on Facebook or visit Twitter and follow Consultancy_HS and Mind.

For more information about other Mind projects focusing on Young African Caribbean Men, please contact Marcel Vige:[email protected] – 0208 215 2222

Get in touch

Working with the capabilities and capacities of African Caribbean people for mental wellness

A masterclass with Dr Hilary Robertson-Hickling, Jamaica

(held in collaboration with HS Consultance on Thursday 27 February 2014)

 

What is resilience and how does it apply to young African Caribbean men (YACM)?

Resilience is the ability of people to cope in the face of adversity, drawing on their internal strengths and those within the social systems in which they live. International studies indicate that social context of many YACM is a critical factor in the higher than average rates of admission to psychiatric hospital. One way to help reduce the number of YACM who break down and end up using psychiatric services is to build resilience in their emotional, psychological, social and economic worlds.

 

About Dr Robertson Hickling

Hilary Robertson-Hickling is a Lecturer in Human Resource Management in the Mona School of Business and Management at the University of the West Indies in Mona Jamaica. She teaches Organizational Behaviour, Organizational Development and Team Building and Management, and Pastoral Care and Counselling  She has studied at the  University of the West Indies , Johns Hopkins University USA and University of Birmingham, England and has taken her concerns about migration and mental health into her research at home in the Caribbean  and into the Caribbean Diaspora. Not only has she published articles in scholarly journals and in the popular press but has published a book entitled White Squall on the Land Narratives of Resilient Caribbean People which has been recently published as an ebook by Hope Road Publishers which specialises in the work of Caribbean, African and Asian writers and is based in London.

As a member of a transnational family she has travelled extensively in North America, the UK and Europe as well having the opportunity to visit continental Africa for a variety of reasons. A concern about the social, economic and psychological wellbeing of Africans at home and abroad has led her to collaborate with her husband Frederick Hickling Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at UWI Mona in the planning of interventions and the conduct of research as well as lecture tours locally and internationally. She has worked as a management consultant and a psychologist.

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