Self-harm

Explains self-harm, including possible causes and how you can access treatment and support. Includes tips for helping yourself, and guidance for friends and family.

Your stories

My body comes with a trigger warning

Seaneen blogs about living with the scars of self-harm.

Seaneen Molloy-Vaughan
Posted on 23/09/2015

...but you look fine to me?

Susanna talks about the difficulties of coping with mental health problems you can see, and those you can't.

Susanna
Posted on 20/10/2014

How going to A&E helped me

Caroline blogs about how a visit to A&E helped her to realise she needed help.

Caroline
Posted on 27/11/2013

What is self-harm?

Self-harm is when you hurt yourself as a way of dealing with very difficult feelings, painful memories or overwhelming situations and experiences that feel out of control. It can be the thing people turn to when they feel they have no other option.

Some people have described self-harm as a way to:

  • express something that is hard to put into words
  • turn invisible thoughts or feelings into something visible
  • change emotional pain into physical pain
  • reduce overwhelming emotional feelings or thoughts
  • have a sense of being in control
  • escape traumatic memories
  • have something in life that they can rely on
  • punish yourself for your feelings and experiences
  • stop feeling numb, disconnected or dissociated (see dissociative disorders)
  • create a reason to physically care for themselves
  • express suicidal feelings and thoughts without taking their own life

Self-harm proved to me I was real, I was alive. At times it also silenced the chaos in my head, briefly pausing the repetitive flashbacks and body memories.

Even though there are always reasons underneath someone hurting themselves, it is important to know that self-harm does carry risks. Once you have started to depend on self-harm, it can take a long time to stop.

How do people self-harm?

There are lots of different forms of self-harming. Some people use the same one all the time, other people hurt themselves in different ways at different times.

Warning

It can be upsetting and potentially triggering to read information about how to self-harm.

If you are feeling vulnerable at the moment, you might not want to read the information below.

Ways of self-harming can include:

  • cutting yourself
  • poisoning yourself
  • over-eating or under-eating
  • biting yourself
  • picking or scratching at your skin
  • burning your skin
  • inserting objects into your body
  • hitting yourself or walls
  • overdosing
  • exercising excessively
  • pulling your hair
  • getting into fights where you know you will get hurt

I think one of my biggest barriers to getting help was actually not admitting to myself that I had a problem. I used to tell myself, 'I’m only scratching, it’s not real self-harm.'

After self-harming, you might feel better and more able to cope for a while. However, the cause of your distress is unlikely to have gone away. Self-harm can also bring up very difficult emotions and could make you feel worse.

If you self-harm, it is important that you know how to look after your injuries and that you have access to the first aid equipment you need. Lifesigns has information on first aid for self-injury and self-harm.

Watch Ben, Lechelle, Debbie and Zainab talk about the reasons behind their self-harm, the different ways they have learned to cope and how they think friends and family could have supported them.


This information was published in October 2016. We will revise it in 2019.


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